Pravin Anand’s latest book, Mumtaz and Taj Mahal, is more about retelling a tale of love, a monumental love that saw the Taj rising. He has used his imagination to colour the realities into a realistic-fiction in which he glorifies the love of Mumtaz and her king, Shahjahan. Moreover, as the ease is too easy and the book can be read by teenagers, youths, young and grown-ups, the book has an appeal for everyone. On the other side, Mumtaz and Taj Mahal is also about the agony of Shah Jahan and the beautiful queen and you will realise once you read Pravin’s work carefully.

My recent reading of the book brought surprises, strange expressions and smiles… The love between Mumtaz and Shahjahan has been discussed in details; and, the intimacy between them also finds a fitting expression which will be interesting for the readers who want to imagine how would the Mughal king live with the beautiful queen. And, there are also the details (fictionalised) that will tell the readers how the couple approached life, various things and their kids. So, Mumtaz and Taj Mahal is a packed fiction, a historical fiction to be precise, for the readers who are interested in knowing the details of love which gave birth to the Taj Mahal!

The book opens in a ‘busy market’ and goes on to pass through various paths before reaching the conclusion that love knows no bounds – even the death of one cannot separate the two who love each other deeply. Pravin’s writing is simple and it will keep the readers, always, at an advantageous position. Readers who want to know everything at once don’t wait to decipher the text and they just want to go on reading and decoding at the same time. Pravin Anand has given them an easy route – his language is simple and his diction comfortable. As a reader, you can go on until you finish the book.

What I liked the most in the book is the same thing. Pravin’s simplicity with the words and thoughts. It’s almost like a person telling you a story of love. There are no curves in the narrative. It’s moving, straight and comprehensive enough all the time. You will seldom find a fashionable dialogue! However, for the readers who would like to read something precious or elite, they might have a little loss of heart here. Pravin’s book is for those who want to know more about Mumtaz and her life with Shahjahan, a little dramatically to keep the interest alive and differentiate it from being a plain history. I won’t recommend this book for the readers who are accustomed to reading serious fiction. Pravin’s Mumtaz and Taj Mahal is a light, simple and less time-consuming fiction and it will be for casual readers, mostly.

Get a copy – Click here to buy Pravin’s book from Amazon India

Mumtaz and Taj Mahal
  • Narrative
  • Theme, Plot & Hanlding
  • Entertainment & Reading Pleasure
3.6

Summary

I find this book a very suitable one-time read that will be interesting and amazing to go through for the readers who think of a tale more than the way it’s told!